Cabinet of Zimbabwe, 2017

CM: Jackson Dalman

Chair: Nithya Pathalam


The happenings of the 2017 Zimbabwe “coup d'état” (even though the military insisted that it was not one) occurred over a very short timeline beginning with the November 14 seizure of control of the Zimbabwe Broadcasting Corporation and key areas of the city by the Zimbabwe Defence Forces and ending with the resignation of Robert Mugabe and the Presidency of Emmerson Mnangagwa on November 24. Though these events happened over the course of 10 days, they triggered a reaction that was global in nature. Understanding the fact that the occurrences in Zimbabwe are considered strange and a “modern coup d'état”, most events in Zimbabwe were unconventional from the lack of military crackdowns to the manner in which Mugabe resigned. As delegates, feel free to use your creativity but stay within the rules of the law to broker negotiations, command military action, and transform this Zimbabwean crisis into your very own!


About the Chair: Nithya Pathalam is a senior at Georgetown University studying Government and Biology. Her interests lie primarily in in biotechnology, health policy, and overall scientific innovation. Originally from Massachusetts and a transfer student to Georgetown from Northeastern University, Nithya has gotten the chance to participate in in numerous Model UN, Model Arab League, and Model NATO conferences in the roles of delegate, staffer, and chair. Outside of being a travelling member of the Georgetown MUN team, Nithya is a member of an on-campus consulting club, avid foodie, and enjoys taking advantage of all of the museums that D.C. has to offer. This is her second and final NCSC and she is extremely excited to see how committee plays out!

About the Crisis Manager: Jackson Dalman is a senior studying Government, with minors in Chinese and History. He has previously served as a director and as a crisis analyst at NCSC, but prefers working in the crisis room and is thrilled to be the Crisis Manager for Cabinet of Zimbabwe. His first crisis experience, representing Malta at Dartmouth’s high school conference, was what hooked him on Model UN and made him a casual follower of Maltese politics to this day.