Afghan Twilight: NATO Withdrawal, 2012

Chair: Albert Zhu

CM: Simon Ospenson


In May of 2012, NATO leaders met in Chicago to endorse a dramatic plan: an 18-month timeline for the withdrawal of 120,000 soldiers from one of the world’s most chaotic regions. Almost simultaneously, renewed Taliban offensives and the rise of new terrorist groups threatened to consume the mountainous country once more. This committee will see delegates from NATO member countries, the US military, the Afghan government, and other interest groups struggle to maintain a semblance of stability as a ten-year era comes to an end with the departure of foreign forces from the infamous “graveyard of empires.” Delegates must navigate a treacherous course between pressure from their governments thousands of miles away and the security demands of a fledgling state plagued from its inception by insurgency and war. Tread carefully: the future of Afghanistan is in your hands.


About the Chair: Albert Zhu is a member of the Class of 2020 at the Georgetown School of Foreign Service, currently majoring in Regional and Comparative Studies with a focus on Asian and US political thought. He is from Beijing, China, and currently lives in New York. At Georgetown, He organizes academic events for the International Relations Club, such as embassy visits, on-campus speakers, and security simulations. He also plays the violin in the university’s Orchestra and Chamber Music Program. In his spare time, he likes to jog along the banks of the Potomac, listen to podcasts and audiobooks, watch TV shows, and play video games on his PC.

About the Crisis Manager: Simon Ospenson is a member of the Class of 2020 in the College. He is studying Russian with intended minors in History and Linguistics, and is happy to be back for his second NCSC. When not staffing NCSC and NAIMUN, Simon travels with Georgetown’s MUN team, leads the Georgetown Fencing Club sabre squad, and competes on the parliamentary debate team. In his free time, Simon likes reading fiction, history, playing piano, and running. He is a proud Bostonian and sometimes even has the accent to prove it.